Climate change and changing landscapes. National Trust properties

Mr Southall modelling the latest wind casualty at Powis Castle. One of 7 i saw.

Mr Southall modelling the latest wind casualty at Powis Castle. One of seven smashed oaks we saw around the park. You can’t afford to lose this many veteran trees in a historic park every year without it changing is character. (good or bad. hard to say but it is changing)  Conservation has been called the management of change. Time for some planning me thinks!

Its been a few weeks since the conveyor belt of storms culminated in the hurricane winds of Feb the 12/ 13th. I blogged earlier how the high winds and rain saturated ground had impacted one National Trust property in Snowdonia. But we are also hearing  stories of impenetrable tree blown properties across Wales. Parklands choked with fallen trees, woodlands which will take months to get to grips with because of so much damage. Park lands with multiple venerable veteran trees snapped in two. In terms of natural processes trees being blown down or even whole woodlands being flattened are nothing new and long may it continue. This creates diversity in woodland structure, openings for younger trees and even logs for me! But and this is a big but do we need to plan for new types of woodlands and structures? If these big winds continue as they say they will because of more energy in the atmosphere then the British woodland landscape will definitely start to change and this could happen quickly. You have tree species and forests all set up to take a certain climate in terms of rain, drought and winds. If this shifts as all the models predict then we need to start planning or coping with this change. What should we do?

The Anglesey Coast path in National Trust Coed y Mor near the Menai Straits. Believe it or not this is an old arboretum. It now looks like forestry contrcators have been through harvesting. The storm hit hard here. As it did at the Stackpole property in Pembrokshire

Cold misty morning. The Anglesey Coast path meandering through the National Trust Coed y Mor property near the Menai Straits. Believe it or not this is an old arboretum. It now looks like forestry contractors have been through harvesting. The storm hit hard here. As it did at the Stackpole property in Pembrokeshire

Simon clearing up the destruction at Craflwyn in Snowdonia. Miles and miles of wind blown trees in the area.

Simon clearing up the destruction at Craflwyn in Snowdonia. Miles and miles of wind-blown trees in the area.

This was a quick video taken on the phone of the  of the Coed y Mor site

 

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