The Highs and Lows of Retro Fit Energy Saving Lighting

The Basics!

The Basics!

It started with a crash course with Lighting Services, looking at colour rendering, (the ability of a light source to reproduce and enhance the colours faithfully in comparison with natural light source), the importance of the correct beam angles, the ease of retro fix, potential energy savings and payback.

Demonstration of the energy savings!

Demonstration of the energy savings!

Lighting Services also demonstrated the “Philips Master Power Saver Set”. The Saver set is a replacement tube and new ballast, easily fitted by a willing volunteer. The ballast has some electronics in it that once the tube is lit, reduces the energy required to keep it lit. On a 58W/5ft tube, the savings are over 20 Watts. The only concern I have is making sure that the fitting is labelled, or over time, as the tube needs replacing, its likely a standard tube or ballast will go back in

22 halogens

22 halogens

Recently I spent the afternoon at East Riddlesden Hall. In just over 1 hour I replaced the twenty two 50W halogen spot lights in the shop with 10W LED equivlents. The quality of the lighting is excellent, hopefully the picture does it justice.

ERH Shop lit by LEDS

ERH Shop lit by LEDS

Based on the opening times for the shop, and adding ½ hour either side, the Philips LEDs will save around 1200 kWhs per year, or 3½ % of the electrical load going through the meter. Good news!

It was nice to get some feedback from Nunnington Hall on how pleased they are with the new LED spots for the exhibition areas. Not only are we saving energy, but enhancing the experience of the visitors to the exhibition. The colour rendering is excellent, but what was interesting in the feedback was that the original lighting put a shadow spot on the pictures, due I think to the filament of the halogens. The new LED spots do not have the shadow.

Fountains Abbey Visitor Centre has over 150 halogen spotlights, each of 50 Watts, a total consumption of around 20,000 kWh per year.

The halogen lighting at FAVC

The halogen lighting at FAVC

Replacing the halogens with 10W LEDs would reduce this to around 4000 kWh per year, a significant saving. Initially we couldn’t get the replacement LEDs to work, but some new samples from Philips seemed to cure the problem. However when I came to do the roll out, the original problem manifested itself again. Further checks identified what looks to be the problem. Each of the light fittings has its own transformer (sometimes known as a “driver”) As you can see from the photo, the driver needs a minimum of 20 Watts to work correctly. The 10W LED is not enough.

The Problem!

The Problem!

Taking one of the fittings home and doing a lash up to connect a second 10W LED proved the point. So the solution is to do some re-wiring to connect two fittings together. This is possible for some of the fittings so it looks like there is a way forward. I just need to work out a way to get a production line going!

Proving the way forward!

Proving the way forward!

This entry was posted in energy efficiency, LED and lighting, Yorkshire & North East and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Highs and Lows of Retro Fit Energy Saving Lighting

  1. Pingback: LED lamps provide a different quality of light to tungsten filament

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